Medical Conditions

  • Gastroenteritis is a medical term referring to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, usually the stomach and intestines. It can be caused by infection with bacteria, viruses, parasites, or reactions to medications or new foods. It often involves abdominal discomfort or pain, diarrhea and/or vomiting.

  • A gastropexy is a surgical procedure that is sometimes performed in large breed dogs to prevent gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV), also known as bloat. A gastropexy may be performed prophylactically or may be done as part of the surgical management of GDV.

  • Gingivitis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the gums. Gingivitis is the earliest phase of periodontal disease.

  • Glaucoma is a disease of the eye in which the pressure within the eye, called the intraocular pressure (IOP) is increased. Intraocular pressure is measured using an instrument called a tonometer.

  • Globoid-cell leukodystrophy (GCL) is also called Krabbe disease, and it is uniformly fatal. GCL is a very rare disease, and it is caused by a mutation on the dog’s DNA.

  • Glomerulonephritis, also known as glomerular nephritis (GN), is a specific type of renal (kidney) disease characterized by inflammation of the glomeruli, which are the tiny structures in the kidneys that act as filters for the blood.

  • Heart disease is a serious medical condition in dogs, cats and humans. Heart disease can be divided into two general groups, congenital and adult onset forms. Cats do not normally develop arteriosclerosis or coronary artery disease, common diseases in humans.

  • A heart murmur is an abnormal heart sound, usually heard by listening to the heart with a stethoscope. Sometimes a murmur is determined to be 'innocent' or 'physiologic', while other times the murmur is determined to be pathologic or caused by disease.

  • Heartworms are a blood-borne parasite called Dirofilaria immitis that reside in the heart or adjacent large blood vessels of infected animals. Recent studies of cats with heart and respiratory diseases have found an incidence of heartworms that is far greater than previously thought. Veterinarians now strongly recommend that all cats receive year-round monthly heartworm preventives in areas where mosquitoes are active all year round.

  • An aural hematoma is a collection of blood, either fresh or clotted, within the pinna (ear flap). When a hematoma is present, the pinna will appear very thick and spongy. The swelling may involve the entire pinna or it may involve only one area of the ear.