Care & Wellness

  • The phrase ‘multidrug resistance mutation 1 (MDR1)’ refers to a specific mutation that can occur at a gene known as the MDR1 gene, also known as the ABCB1 gene. Many herding breeds (most commonly Collies and Australian Shepherds) have a mutation at the MDR1 gene that makes them more sensitive to the negative effects of certain medications.

  • Neutering and castration are the common terms used to describe the surgical procedure known scientifically as orchidectomy or orchiectomy. In this procedure, both testicles are removed in order to sterilize a male cat.

  • Not all puppy foods are alike. Not all pups are alike. Feeding the right diet to the right puppy is very important, especially when it comes to large or giant breed pups.

  • In North America, obesity is the most common preventable disease in cats. Approximately 25-35% of the general feline population is obese, with 40-45% of cats aged 5-11 years old weighing in higher than normal.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. It is one of the most common chronic diseases that affect cats. By some estimates, 90% of cats over 10 years of age are affected by OA.

  • Overweight and obesity have emerged as the most important disease processes in cats today. The perils of obesity are far-reaching. It shortens cats’ lives and can actually contribute to chronic inflammatory pain. The good news is that obesity is preventable. More good news is that even if a cat is overweight or obese, the disease can be reversed, normal body condition can be restored, and life expectancy can be returned to normal.

  • More than 50% of cats and dogs in North America are overweight or obese. These epidemic levels are reflected in the human population as well. Obesity in pets is now the most important disease process pet owners must face. And the effects of obesity are far reaching because it contributes to many other diseases and shortens cats’ lives.

  • As all cat owners know, cats are NOT small dogs! And when it comes to pain and pain management, this is certainly true. Fortunately for cats and the people who love them, veterinarians have made excellent progress in understanding cat pain and how to manage it.

  • Palliative care and hospice have become an important part of end-of-life care in human medicine, and they’re becoming more important and common in veterinary medicine.

  • Veterinary palliative medicine is a philosophy of care in which a decision has been made to decline or withdraw the pursuit of curative therapy for a life-limiting illness. Some diseases that we treat in cats are managed over the long term without any hope for a cure.