Content Library

  • Is your dog lovable, smart, and obedient? Is she/he also really good-looking? If you want others to know just how great your dog is, perhaps you should consider showing them off!

  • Stress is a commonly used word that describes feelings of strain or pressure. Our furry friends can become stressed, too. The signs of canine anxiety are often subtle, so how can we tell they are stressed?

  • This tumor is a disordered and purposeless overgrowth of sweat gland cells. Most sweat glands are attached to the hair follicles (“paratrichial”, or beside the hair) but a few are not associated with follicles (atrichial).

  • A biopsy is one of the more common diagnostic procedures performed in cats and people. Skin biopsies provide valuable insight into the type of cells contained in an abnormal area of skin or a skin growth, and whether the lesion poses a more serious health threat to your pet.

  • This slow-growing tumor is a disordered overgrowth of cells of the epidermis, or outer layer of skin. It gets its name from its resemblance under the microscope to the basal cell layer of epithelium.

  • This is one of many similar tumors that arise by disordered growth of the hair follicles. Almost all of these tumors are benign and can be permanently cured by total surgical removal.

  • Lymphocytes are specialized cells that function as part of the body’s immune system, and are key cells in the body’s ability to fight and prevent infection. Lymphocytes are found in the blood and tissues throughout the body, and are in particular concentration in lymph nodes and other ‘lymphoid tissue’.

  • Melanocytes are cells that produce a pigment called melanin. They are found in many parts of the body where there is pigment, particularly skin, hair and eyes.

  • This tumor is a disordered and purposeless overgrowth of sebaceous gland cells. These glands are attached to the hair follicles where their function is to lubricate the hairs and skin.

  • This is a malignant tumor of skin epidermal cells with varying degrees of differentiation (resemblance to normal, non-cancerous cells). Tumors of this type occur in people and all domestic species.