Content Library

  • Many dogs experience fear, anxiety, and stress (FAS) when faced with a visit to the veterinary clinic. FAS can be a problem at many points leading up to and during the veterinary visit. Your veterinarian can guide you in conditioning the dog to better enjoy time in the car, helping the dog not to associate car rides with “bad” things.

  • A growling dog can be frightening. But the dog may be growling because he is frightened of you. This begs the question: is the scary dog truly aggressive or just scared stiff?

  • Fear is a physiological, behavioral, and emotional reaction to stimuli that an animal encounters. The physiological reaction results in an increase in heart rate, increased respiratory rate (panting), sweating, trembling, pacing, and possibly urination and defecation. Behaviorally, an animal will exhibit changes in body posture and activity when afraid.

  • A fecal Baermann is a specialized test for detecting certain types of parasites or “worms.”

  • Fecal flotation is a routine veterinary test used to diagnose internal parasites or “worms”. The test detects the eggs of mature parasites that live inside the body and pass their eggs to the outside by shedding them in the host's stool.

  • “Fecal occult blood” refers to the presence of small quantities of blood in the stool that cannot be seen with the naked eye (“occult” means “concealed from view”). The blood can come from anywhere in the digestive tract, including the mouth, stomach, intestines or rectum.

  • Kittens are typically weaned off of their mother’s milk at about 8 weeks of age and become reliant on pet owners for their nutrition. The goal of feeding growing kittens is to lay the foundation for a healthy adulthood.

  • Over 50% of cats in North America are either overweight or obese, so paying attention to the balance between activity and calorie intake is important

  • The population of mature and senior cats is increasing. In fact, 35-40% of cats in North America are at least 7 years of age, and it’s not uncommon for cats to live well into their twenties. Better nutrition, safer lifestyles, and improvements to preventive healthcare have contributed to this trend.

  • Newborn kittens are relatively immature at birth compared to many other mammals. The period of time they spend being nursed by their mother (queen) helps the newborn kitten transition from in utero nutrition to solid food. If the queen is incapable of raising her kittens herself, the kittens are considered orphans and some important needs must be met in order to ensure their survival.