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  • Nutrition plays an important role in determining the health and longevity of cats. Here is an overview of how to ensure your cat receives the right nutritional formulation.

  • Cats are considered to be adults by the time they are 1 year old. It is not uncommon for them to live up to 20 years or longer. Once they reach 7 or 8 years of age, however, cats are considered to be “senior citizens,” and age-related diseases and metabolic changes begin to emerge.

  • Alveolar osteitis is a relatively common condition that is the result of chronic periodontal disease in cats. It can occur around the upper or the lower canine teeth.

  • Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a virus that is an important cause of upper respiratory infections and oral disease in cats. This virus infects cats throughout the world, and can cause disease in both domestic and exotic species of the cat family.

  • Demodecosis is a parasitic skin condition, caused by demodex mites. These microscopic mites can be found on the skin of all animals, but in some cases they proliferate to excessive levels and cause clinical signs.

  • Eosinophilic granuloma complex is a term used to describe three forms of skin lesions in cats: 1) eosinophilic plaque, 2) eosinophilic granuloma and 3) indolent ulcers. These lesions have a characteristic microscopic appearance due to the presence of eosinophils, which are a form of inflammatory cell. The term is descriptive, referring to the microscopic appearance of the lesion.

  • Once a cat becomes overweight or obese, they have had the opportunity to develop a habit of overeating. This unsurprisingly leads to food inhalation, “counter surfing”, and constant begging.

  • Feline Hemotrophic Mycoplasmosis (FHM) is the current name for a relatively uncommon infection of cats. With this disease, the cat's red blood cells are infected by a microscopic blood parasite. The subsequent destruction of the infected red blood cells results in anemia. Anemia is a medical term referring to a reduction in the numbers of red blood cells (erythrocytes) or in the quantity of the blood pigment hemoglobin, which carries oxygen.

  • Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR) is an infectious disease caused by feline herpesvirus type-1. As with other herpes viruses, the virus is very species specific, and is only known to cause infections in domestic and wild cats. The virus can infect cats of all ages.

  • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a virus specific to the cat family. It was first recognized in the mid 1980's and it has been found in cats worldwide. Although widespread, it is not a common infection in cats. Only 1-5% of cats show evidence of exposure to the virus. In some cats exposure to the virus leads to clinical signs and symptoms that result in deficiency in the immune system.

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